NASA publishes a new image from space

space telescope James Webb Passed time and huge amounts of dust to take a new picture of galaxy wheel chariot With unprecedented clarity, as I reported on Tuesday before Container and the European Space Agency (ESA).

Located about 500 million light-years from Earth, in the constellation Sculptor, the chariot wheel took shape after a head-on collision between two galaxies.

They explained that the collision caused two rings to spread out from the center of the galaxy, “like ripples in a pond after a stone was thrown into it.” Container and ESA in a joint statement.

The statement added that a small white ring in the center of the galaxy, while the outer ring with its colorful sides, has been expanding in the universe about 440 million years ago. As it expands outward, it collides with gas, causing new stars to form.

The Hubble telescope has already taken pictures of this strange ring galaxy, which is thought to have been spiral like the Milky Way before it was collided with a smaller galaxy.

But the Webb telescope, launched in December 2021, has a longer range to capture images.

They said Webb’s ability to detect infrared light allowed him to see “a huge amount of hot dust” that obscured the view of the Cartwheel Galaxy. Container and ESA.

This revealed new details about the formation of stars in the galaxy, as well as the behavior of the supermassive black hole at its core, they said.

It was also able to detect areas rich in hydrocarbons and other chemicals such as Earth-like dust.

Behind the wheel of the wagon, two more small galaxies shine, and behind them more structures can be seen.

Studies from the image show that the Kartwell wheel galaxy is still in a “very transient phase,” according to space agencies.

“Webb gives us a quick glimpse into the current state of the Cartwheel and also provides insight into what happened to this galaxy in the past and how it will evolve in the future.”

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