An alternative for non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients on the island

The device is intended for the population due to the low risk it poses during and after surgery.

The Mennonite Health System team of health professionals and workers. Photo: Introduction to the Journal of Medicine and Public Health.

After you have finished setting the device and prices Number 100 in Mennonite Health System, the multidisciplinary team in the district cardiology He explained, exclusively, to the Journal of Medicine and Public Health, the scope and utility of the population.

As pointed out by Dr. Jose Rivera Irrizary, Director of cardiology In the health center, it was the first implanted device in the Mennonite Health System in 2018, which was implemented by Dr. Pedro Colon, meanwhile, the number 100 was placed in April 2022.

“Every patient with a device implanted here goes through different specialists, which is why it works with minimal complications, and although it is a simple procedure, it also has a level of complexity when it comes to patient selection,” he explained.

The doctor added that the Watchman device has been in use for more than 20 years, and so far it is estimated that there are more than 155,000 patients with these devices in the world. “.

For his part, Dr. Pedro Colon, Interventional Cardiologist and Director of the Foundation’s Structural Program, noted that the safety of the device has emerged since the first device was implanted, with promising results in patients who met the clinical criteria for benefit. of this technology.

“A lot of them — the patients — come in with questionable expectations, but when we show them that this is a minimally invasive procedure and that the risks are low, the patient’s expectations change and they say, ‘I want to do it as quickly as possible,’” Colonne.

An important aspect revealed by Dr. Jose Martial, an electrophysiologist, is that the device has five different sizes to adapt it to the anatomy of the patient’s heart.

“This device shows an efficacy of 90%, because there are five different sizes and basic to be able to adjust them to suit the anatomy of the patient’s heart,” the specialist said, adding that the operation takes place in less than an hour, with minimal invasiveness. With a low risk of bleeding.

Finally, Dr. Eric Aviles, a cardiologist at Mennonite Health System, noted that atrial fibrillation is the most common mole, and it is known that in the United States at least five million people suffer from this condition, the projection is that in 2030 it will be 21 Millions of people are sick with this disease.

Dr. Eric Aviles, cardiologist at Mennonite Health System. Photo: Introduction to the Journal of Medicine and Public Health.

Roberto Rizzo, Business Unit Director, Boston Scientific. Photo: Introduction to the Journal of Medicine and Public Health.

A team of professionals from the Mennonite Health System. Photo: Introduction to the Journal of Medicine and Public Health.

Dr. Jose Rivera Irisari, director of cardiology at the health center. Photo: Introduction to the Journal of Medicine and Public Health.

Jaime Soler, patient with Dr. Pedro Colon and Dr. Eric Alves. Photo: Introduction to the Journal of Medicine and Public Health.

Dr. Eric Lives, cardiologist. Photo: Introduction to the Journal of Medicine and Public Health.

Jaime Soler, patient with Dr. Pedro Colon and Dr. Eric Alves. Photo: Introduction to the Journal of Medicine and Public Health.

Dr. Jose Marcial, MD, is an electrophysiologist at Mennonite Health System. Photo: Introduction to the Journal of Medicine and Public Health.

Precisely for this reason, the specialist reported that this condition is associated with a higher risk of stroke, and although not all patients with defibrillation will have a stroke, “we have identified that they have certain characteristics that make them more at risk. heart It can be transmitted to the brain.

Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat and can cause blood clots in the heartThis increases the risk of stroke, heart failure and other associated complications heart.

Regarding the risks of taking anticoagulants, the specialist explained, “We establish some risks and accordingly decide to use anticoagulants, and we usually use them in older patients who suffer from other comorbidities such as diabetes, kidney disease and high blood pressure. It is a calculated risk, but this risk exists.” .

He added that during his consultation he gets to know patients and when he sees that their risk of bleeding is high “enter this form, and here begins the conversation with patients as a clinical alternative. These procedures usually benefit older patients, with a history of previous bleeding, or another medication that increases the risk of bleeding or Kidney failure.

Finally, patient Jaime Soler reported that prior to the procedure he had many factors against him due to his condition, even after using anticoagulants, his life was limited to once-a-day moments, such as shaving or going to the dentist. Bleeding risk.

He concluded, “The atrial fibrillation continues, but I am calm because I can go out and walk and be calm.”

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